Karen LeGault ~Fine Art Blog

November 7, 2013

Working with Pen and Ink

Filed under: Floral/Botanical,Uncategorized — by Karen LeGault @ 19:01
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http://www.karenlegault.com

by Karen LeGault

In my high school art classes everyone had a chance to work with pen and ink. In those days we used the crow quill pens that you would dip into a jar of ink to draw with. Inevitably there were always blobs from the nib that drop here and there, or smudges from a hand as the quill moved across the paper dragging a splotch from a blob.

A few years later a friend encouraged me to work with a rapidograph pen, a technical pen with a vulnerable filament of a needle that had a chance of bending if you took it apart to clean it. The beauty of using the pen lies in its perfect lines and permanent ink, non-soluble ink.

Fortunately rapidograph pens evolved and the vulnerable needles are now encased in a cartridge barrel that protects it from the user. The cartridges can be replaced when they wear out.

The drawback of these technical pens is that the ink that is formulated to be used in these pens may dry between uses, causing the needle to stick in the cartridge, requiring a thorough soaking with water and a dissolving agent to free up its movement and release of ink. There has been more than a few times when I soaked a pen cartridge for a few days in a solution of ammonia and water to get it to loosen up.

In Today’s Art Stores there are numerous disposable technical pens, drawing pens that do not have the problem of drying ink. Line work looks pretty good, though nothing really beats the clean line of ink released from a metal nib in a barrel such as a Rapidograph.

When I first started drawing plants in pen and ink, I drew them using the cross hatch style that grew out of the printing industries need to receive image images that separated the ink on their plates enough so that ink wouldn’t look blotchy and build up on the printing plates too thickly after repeated printings. Using cross hatching you can indicate the shading and subtle changes of plane that plants have a lot of. Think of the drawing of Durer for example.

As I grew dissatisfied with the mechanical look of cross hatching and began to aim for a more free and fluid look I began to draw without the cross hatching and to use instead scribbles and dots to help see the shifts in plane.

I spent several years drawing almost exclusively with a pen when I had time, refining my ability to record “place in space”, passing many hours at the UC Berkeley Botanical Garden “interviewing” single plants and filling my notebooks with our meetings.

Drawing with the limitations of a pen, which has a singular sort of line, eventually segued into applying everything I had learned into the multi-dimensionality of the bamboo brush used in Oriental Brush Painting.

Image

I found that a pen and ink “study” would increase my understanding of the forms within a subject rapidly so that executing the same with a brush was more successful.

Above is an example circa 1986 of a pen and ink drawing that I added watercolor to.

┬ęKaren LeGault

http://www.karenlegault.com

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